Cranbrook Country Park falls within the flood plain of the local stream – the Crannybrook – from where the town gets its name. Crannybrook is already home to the Kingfisher, and Otters have been seen visiting the stream. As the area is so wet, Dragonflies and Damselflies will be abundant around the Country Park in late spring and summer, and the East Devon District Council Countryside team runs Dragonfly spotter days to help you meet your natural neighbours.

During the winter months the ground is likely to be wet. However, the landowners are working hard to help install a route of hard surfaced paths, on which you will be able to make use of the Country Park for the whole year. It presently comes in small parcels including the railway line fields, the dog walking area, central orchard and grassland, standing deadwood field and the area on the southern side of the old A30. In the future these will all link up with crossing points over the internal link roads in the town.

The Country Park used to be an intensive dairy farm. The grassland over the years has been much improved.

The historical landscape of Cranbrook also has untold stories, from the Roman Road that runs beneath the Country Park to the Bronze Age burial mounds and sacred fossilised tree that were found beneath the new school.

The Country Park is managed by Cranbrook Town Council. The East Devon District Council countryside team run events in the park throughout the year.

Location

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Map legend

Reserve boundaries
Reserve boundaries
Public Bridleway
Public Bridleway
Byway
Byway
Public Footpath
Public Footpath
Permissive Footpath
Permissive Footpath
 Nature Reserve Car Parks
Nature Reserve Car Parks
Information
Information
Bird Hides
Bird Hides
Entrances
Entrances

There is a map in the Younghayes Centre (open 7 days a week) which shows up to date information on the access points to the Country Park, which may vary due to ongoing construction at Cranbrook.

Directions

Get directions to Cranbrook Country Park nature reserve with Google Maps.

Walking information

A series of surfaced and grass paths give access throughout the park. Level ground with no steps or stiles.

Dogs

No dogs in areas where livestock are grazing, and in the Nature Reserve.