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1. What types of business can apply for the OHLG grant?

Hospitality - Food courts, Public houses/pub restaurants, Restaurants, Roadside restaurants, Wine bars, Cafés

Leisure - Casinos and gambling clubs, Cinemas, Museums and art galleries, Stately homes & historic houses, Theatres, Zoos & safari parks, Amusement parks, Wedding venues, Events venues, Night clubs & discotheques, Arenas, Concert halls, Tourist attractions, Theme parks, Amusement arcades, Soft play centres or areas, Clubs & institutions, Village halls & scout huts, cadet huts, etc.

Accommodation - Caravan parks, Caravan sites and pitches, Chalet parks, Coaching inns, Country house hotels, Guest houses, Hostels, Hotels, Lodge Holiday apartments, Cottages or bungalows, Campsites, Boarding houses, Canal boats or other vessels, B&Bs, Catered holiday homes, Holiday homes.

2. How much can I claim under the OHLG grant?

The Omicron Hospitality and Leisure Grant will support hospitality, leisure and accommodation business premises with one-off grants of up to £6,000. The following thresholds apply for these businesses:

Businesses occupying hereditaments appearing on the local rating list with a rateable value of exactly £15,000 or under on 30 December 2021 will receive a payment of £2,667.

Businesses occupying hereditaments appearing on the local rating list with a rateable value over £15,000 and less than £51,000 on 30 December 2021 will receive a payment of £4,000.

Businesses occupying hereditaments appearing on the local rating list with a rateable value of exactly £51,000 or over on 30 December 2021 will receive a payment of £6,000.

3. I don’t have a business rates number, can I still claim?

Businesses that are not within the ratings system will not be eligible to receive funding under this scheme. If you do not have a business rates number you will need to see if you are eligible and claim under the ARG scheme once it is live.

4. I have not received an email with an access code, can I still claim?

Business that have not received correspondence with an access code can still claim if they believe they should be entitled to the grant. We have used previous applications to build our list of potentially eligible businesses.

5. Are gyms included in the definition of a leisure business?

As per paragraph 34 of the OHLG Guidance: “the definition of a leisure business should exclude: …gyms and sports businesses where physical exercise or training is conducted on an individual basis or group basis.”
Gyms and sports businesses include dance and fitness studios; sports centres and clubs; sports courts; swimming pools and golf courses. This list is not exhaustive.

If it is unclear whether a business is primarily supplying a leisure or an exercise opportunity it is for Local Authorities to determine eligibility.

6. Are sports clubs with bars or other social spaces defined as leisure businesses?

Gyms and sports businesses where physical exercise or training is conducted on an individual basis or group basis are excluded from the definition of leisure.

Club spaces that provide opportunities, experiences and facilities, in particular for culture, recreation, entertainment, celebratory events and days and nights out, may meet the definition of a leisure business.

If a business provides both services, the main service principle will determine whether a business receives funding (see OHLG guidance paragraph 22).

If it is unclear whether a business is primarily supplying a leisure or an exercise opportunity it is for Local Authorities to determine eligibility.

7. Are holiday lets and second homes eligible for the OHLG?

Second homeowners not trading as a business cannot claim a grant of any amount. The scheme eligibility is clear that private dwellings are not eligible for funding which is strictly provided for businesses only.

Holiday accommodation businesses are eligible for the OHLG provided they have evidence they were trading as a business on 30 December 2021, and only where they are a business listed on the business rates register. Local Authorities must use their discretion to determine if a business is trading, but where businesses cannot demonstrate any income generated from the let of the premises under consideration over a given period (e.g. the last 6-months), then this could justify a judgement that the business is not trading. Paragraph 25 of the guidance provides a non-exhaustive list of other trading indicators that can help assess what can be defined as trading for the purposes of the grant schemes.

8. Is a new application form always required or can Local Authorities use information previously provided by applicants?

Local Authorities should not rely on previous verification or assurance activity completed under any previous scheme. We must be able to demonstrate the application information used is accurate and up to date and that the business is eligible for support under the OHLG scheme.

9. Will my data be shared with any other agencies or institutions?

This data may be shared with BEIS. The BEIS privacy notice, setting out how BEIS will handle personal data across all COVID-19 business grant schemes, can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-grant-schemes-privacynotice/covid-19-grant-schemes-privacy-notice.

In addition, we may share your personal data with other council services, other local authorities and government organisations to check the information provided in your application.

We will not disclose any personal information to any other third parties unless required to do so by law or where it is appropriate to support our duty to protect public funds and/or detect and prevent fraud.

10. It says my business must be trading, can you clarify what you mean by trading?

For the purposes of this grant scheme, a business is considered to be trading if it is engaged in business activity. This should be interpreted as carrying on a trade or profession, or buying and selling goods or services in order to generate turnover. Fully constituted businesses in liquidation, dissolved, struck off or subject to a striking-off notice are not eligible under these conditions. To help further, some trading indicators are included below that can help assess what can be defined as trading for the purposes of the grant schemes. Indicators that a business is trading are:

• The business continues to trade, including online, via delivery services etc.
• The business is not in liquidation, dissolved, struck off or subject to a striking-off notice or under notice
• The business is engaged in business activity; managing accounts, preparing for reopening, planning and implementing COVID-safe measures

This list of indicators is not exhaustive and we will use our discretion to determine if a business is trading.